Thursday, 18 December 2014

From Miles: 28mm French Line Infantry Battalion (151 Points)



As hinted at with my "Cold" bonus theme submission, my next entry is a 36 figure French Line Infantry Battalion in 28mm Scale.  The figures are Perry plastics and are all in a March attack pose. These figures are very easy to paint and I find them to work really well on the table.


This will be the 9th French Infantry battalion added to my little army.  Sadly it's been a few years since any of the lads have seen the table top.



Each figure is based on a 20mm square metal base which are then grouped into companies using magnetic 60x40mm bases.  I try to base all my 28's on single metal bases to make rebasing easy.


I base my French in three ranks of 12 and only allow the first two to fire, which given the rules advantages the french in melee but limits their musketry capability.  Their usual foes, the Brits are consist of 40 figure battalions in two ranks which advantages their musketry but limits melee.

As six of these figures were submitted as part of my "Cold" entry there are only 30 score-able figures here so this entry should net me 150 points.

My French force now consists on 9 Infantry battalions (8 line, 1 Guard), 5 calvary regiments and only 3 artillery batteries.  Hopefully the lack of Artillery will be remedied later on in this year's Challenge.
From Curt:
Ah, 'the beautiful game'... What a stonking unit of French Ligne - wonderful work, Miles. By your current count, I think you've gathered a fairly respectable French force over the past few years . Actually I've found that there comes saturation point in gaming in this scale as most tables can only accommodate so many 28mm units. I subscribe to Jim Purky's 'the rule of fours' in that a typical player can comfortably command four units within any game system (four battalions for a Brigade level game, four brigades for a Divisional level scenario, etc.) and after that it often starts to become a muddle as there is simply too much to process.  Miles, what rules do you use for playing Napoleonics? Black Powder? Lasalle?  There's so many titles out now that players are spoiled for choice (and Sam Mustafa's much anticipated 'Blucher' is due to be released in a few months, I think - my fingers twitch eagerly to get at copy of those) .

15 comments:

  1. These guys are really good. Always shied away from Napoleonic troops, far too complicated to paint, but I may give them a go in the future. Like the rules differences you use. I plan to give my ACW Union troops better range but make the Confederates better shots.

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  2. Thanks for the comments - it's hard to go wrong with Perry plastics and the French figures are no exception.

    I typically play either Black Powder or a set of House Rules from Ernie from Architects of War.

    I too subscribe to the rule of four but every now and then I do violate it. The link below is to a blog post of a big Nap game - the French attack column has 288 figures in it (8 36 figure infantry battalions)! Sometimes its fun just to throw all the toys on the table

    http://lairoftheubergeek.blogspot.com/2011/04/peninsular-campaign-battle-somewhere-in.html

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  3. Fantastic painting work. I admire you for painting (so well) so many Napoleonic figures!

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  4. Great stuff Miles. You're tempting me back to the bigger scales for H&M with this stuff. Vive L'Empereur!

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  5. Lovely!

    I'm so glad my Napoleonic battalions only average around 10 figures I couldn't cope with painting that many figures per battalion; it was hard enough getting a whole corps painted with the strongest only 9 figs!

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  6. good job. squad looks as a whole, and it is very important

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  7. The colours and the spectacle does make everything look good . Nice painting and Who would not be happy to have such a unit to command on the table top.

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  8. Another points bomb of quality

    Ian

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  9. Great work, and a nice chunk o' points to boot!

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