Sunday, 26 February 2017

From Curt: Italian Wars Spanish Rodeleros (80 Points)


Thirteen entries! Well, that turned out to be quite a good day after all.  Great work Team Saturday!

Before I toddle off for bed, I'll close off the day with an entry of my own. 

I've been working on these figures off-and-on since the start of the Challenge. I was hoping to get them in on Friday for the anniversary of the Battle of Pavia, but it just wasn't in the cards.  Nonetheless, I'm still happy to see them off the table and awaiting orders in the display cabinet.


These are Spanish 'Rodeleros', translated as 'shield bearers', or known simply as shield-and-buckler men. They were an interesting troop type, which saw brief prominence during the early 16th century. 


The rodeleros usefulness was being able to break the deadlock between contesting blocks of pike (and in this way they were very similar to the Landsknetches and Swiss halberdiers). Once the rodeleros maneuvered past the hedge of pikes, and got in tight with their foes, their half-plate armour, long swords and small shields made them superior to the lightly protected pikemen.


Nevertheless, the rodeleros, like most classes of infantry, were particularly vulnerable to cavalry, especially eastern light cavalry such as the stradiots, and so had to be cautiously employed and judiciously commanded. 

Though they had a short time of glory in Italy, Cortes' campaigns in the New World was largely made possible by having a host of rodeleros at his back.

This unit is made up of an assortment of 28mm figures from The Assault Group (TAG), Foundry and Eureka Miniatures. I really like the Spanish/Portugues conquistadors from Eureka. They have a great sense of spirit and animation - the commander exhorting his men, seen below in the center, is from the Eureka range. 



The TAG castings were somewhat smaller than the rest, so I made a small rise for them running along the center of the base to serve as a crest, to help mask their slight statures.



I often try to put a boulder or stump at the rear of my large bases so players have something to grip on to when moving them on the table. For this base I've used a 3D printed stump that I scaled to a useful size (this same design was used for my Francis command stand).


Historically, these bravos probably wouldn't be carrying their own banner, but I like my units to have flags, so they've been gifted one from Pete's Flags to hoist in the breeze.


These sixteen swordsmen should give me 80 points for the slow climb out of the doldrums. Eaaaxcellent.

Okay, tomorrow, after a bit of a sleep-in and a bit of brunch, I'll announce the results of our 'West' theme.  See you soon!

44 comments:

  1. Oh these are wonderful, lovely work and should also count towards our renaissance side challenge.
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks very much Iain! Yes they will help salve my honour in our duel, but not much else I'm afraid. :)

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  2. These are lovely sculpts, and so skilfully painted and based. Well done, Curt!

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    1. I was really spoiled in the types and quality of figures for this unit. It definitely makes the painting that much easier!

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  3. The figures are truly lovely, and the basing works really well. I like the subtle addition of the stump to move the base and keep fingers off your miniatures!

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    1. Cheers Steve. Yes, these larger vignette-style bases need a bit of help for the convenience of moving.

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  4. Curt you really need to stop this! You keep entering lovely Italian wars and I'm trying to resist getting into this at the moment! Wonderful work and great idea with the tree stump!

    Christopher

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    1. Haha! Christopher, you'd have a ball with this period and I'm convinced your stuff would be fabulous.

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  5. Your painting quality continues to amaze me - its really is astonishing

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    1. Very kind of you Miles, thank you!

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  6. Ooh I love your Italian Wars figures! Could you remind us where you get those wondwrful bases from?

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    1. Thanks Dux! I had the good folks over at Warbases design these for me. Just drop Martin or Diane a note and they'll get you sorted out.

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  7. These look awesome Curt! I like the stump for the easier movement. Great idea.

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    1. Thanks Rod. Of course, it will never get used for its intended purpose... ;)

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  8. The idea for a hand-hold on the bases is simply brilliant! Having seen Alatriste not so long ago these Spanish really push my button and I need to make sure not get drawn into another new project...

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    1. I loved Hugo in 'Alatriste'! If you ever loose your resolve there is a new range coming out from Tercios Miniatures (I had to back it of course) :)

      https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1418344245/tercios-miniatures?ref=user_menu

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    2. Sorry, I meant Vigo, not Hugo...

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    3. lol, my youngest son is called Hugo!
      Nah I won't branch out to this no-one here will play this with me... :-(

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  9. Brilliant. Cracking paint job and the ridge is a great idea along with the tree stump. Always interesting for a historical know-nothing like me to understand what these units did and sounds like this lot were very rock-paper-scissors in what they could and couldn't do!

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    1. Thanks Jamie. Yes, history seems replete with examples of specific unit-types being created for focused roles that, in turn, can get zapped by yet something else.

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  10. Stunning Curt. This project is so wonderful in all its colour, I love what you're doing with it, and the bases are so well thought out.

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    1. Thanks Phil! I'm having a great time with these - they're a real treat.

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  11. Always a highlight of the week, a snowlord post. Beautiful work

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    1. Ha, you're too kind Martin, but thank you. :)

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  12. Fantastic work dude - congrats on getting those fellows finished.

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    1. Thanks Greg, they took a bit longer than anticipated but its nice to have them done.

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  13. Absolutely wonderful work sir. This is why I've stopped my Italian Wars painting! I will try to remember the stump however.

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    1. Don't stop Pete! The more on the tabletop the merrier. Thanks for the kind words.

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  14. An excellent addition to the time period collection. Bravo. Cheers

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    1. Cheers Brendon! Now your light horse has more to run-down. :)

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  15. Those swordsmen are StonKING wonderful! The hardest part of seeing your Italian Wars is knowing the huge box of hardly touched Empire I've got! Sooo many slashed sleeves, plumes, big hats et al...and stripes!
    I love the colors and the basing, nice bit that tree stump! ;)

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    1. Thanks Dave, very kind of you. I look forward to seeing your Empire army emerge in a future Challenge.

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  16. That my friend is the single coolest thing I have seen all in a loooong time!

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    1. Ah, Millsy you're too kind, but thank you.

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  17. A wondrous entry Curt, and what a great idea using the home made tree stump too!

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    1. Thanks Ray. If I was truly industrious I would have pulled a root out of the frozen garden to do its proper.

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  18. That's some tremendous work Curt! Your Italian Wars stuff really makes it hard to not get into yet another period.

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    1. Very kind of you Nick, thanks!

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