Thursday, 1 February 2018

From KenR - 28mm WW1 Highlanders (140 points)


This week we are back to the WW1 Mesopotamia Collection with this collection of 28mm Highlanders, those if you with very good memories will recall I did 9 of these for last years challenge, here is the rest of the Battalion, minus a bloke with a bagpipe who has been held back for the next bonus round.


There are a mix of manufactures here, the bulk from a very small 28mm range from Minifigs, the Lewis Gun Teams and command, including the lovely figure with the stretcher on his shoulder are from the Empress Miniatures Jazz Imperialism range.


The HMG is from Great War Miniatures as neither Empress or Minifigs did them, so that's 3 x 8 Fig companies plus a 3 fig MG with a half crew mounted weapon for a net 28 figures worth or 140 points.


This unit was inspired by the book "With a Highland Regiment in Mesopotamia" which is available HERE, however you can find it on some of the free book sites due to its age.


It's a really good personal account from the Black Watch battalion that arrived in the area after the initial push and was involved in the attempts to relieve the Siege of Kut. The volume of casualties they take is horrendous, dropping from a full battalion to 200 or so men on a regular basis.


It also contains some great snippets of info, for example the units would march to and from the front line in kilts (as painted) with bagpipe playing, before changing into shorts and shirts in the trenches.

I am away to Italy on a badly timed (for the Challenge) holiday so nothing from me next week, but when I do return it will be back to WW2 Desert vehicles and my first German Armour.

These are absolutely brilliant.  I'm not a historical gamer, but I do find myself fascinated by these little pockets of somewhat unusual battle attire, although I suspect the kilts were probably rather good in this type of theatre!

They look like a wonderfully coherent bunch and the basing sets them off excellently - 140 points to you it is!

32 comments:

  1. Wonderful brushwork Ken - I love the little snippet on the Highlanders and their kilt 'optics'. Great stuff.

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  2. Ok Ken now I need to have words with you. First you keep dropping these bombs of wonderfully painted figs and gear from two theatres I'd love to game. Then you throw in old school to get my naustalgic heart a flutter. Then you announce that you'll miss a week to go to bloody Italy! Meanwhile I running on gas fumes and fighting fever and chills while the windchill goes below minus 30!

    Anyway it wouldnt torque my tail so much if youre stuff wasn't so wonderful! I now you're not supposed to ask a Scotsman about what he's wearing below the belt, but here goes. Is that a khaki overkilt on top of the wool plaid?
    Cheers, Peter

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    1. Peter, should Lynn be worried? You know, just checkin'... ;)

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    2. "What is worn under the kilt?"

      "Nothing. It's all in perfect working order!"
      ; )

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    3. @Curt yes but not for the reasons you're suggesting
      @Ev quite right but I'm asking what is worn over the kilt

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    4. Thank you Peter for your kind words, I am after all living the life of Reilly ๐Ÿ˜‰

      The kilt covers are known as aprons, they had been used occasionally prior to WW1 but became the norm during that conflict. There is a good article here

      http://antiqueoutings.com/kilt-aprons-and-kilt-covers-of-ww1-ww2/

      It's a very under studied period and to be honest until I did some family tree and found I had a great uncle serving in Mesopotamia I knew very much.

      Thanks again.

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    5. Cool link on the kilt aprons. I learned about this campaign at an IWM exhibit in 1985. The idea of a Victorian era masted gunboat ferrying the GHQ plus a few infantry platoons up the Euphrates is hard to app up.

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    6. To right, what's not to like.

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  3. Ken - this Mesopotamia project has been bloody amazing, and I find myself chuffed to be even part of this indirectly, if only because we are both part of the Thursday cohort!

    Incredible work, and this is a period I will be pursuing in the future, basically because your stuff has inspired me! One of the best aspects of the Challenge. Great stuff.

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    1. Thanks Greg, Go Team Thursday !

      It's a fantastic period, the variety in units on both sides and the addition of gunboats etc make it a real joy.

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  4. Lovely bit of work on these braw laddies, Ken, well done!

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  5. I like this unit a lot. Very interested in IWW although mostly focused in Europe, need now to expand my horizons. Thanks for the info

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    1. Every day is a school day ๐Ÿ˜‚ It's a great area of WW1 to look at along with Palestine.

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  6. Your mesopotamia posts are always entertaining and educational! Lovely bunch of jocks! I remember reading great uncle Freds war an illustrated diary that covered the near East in ww1 interesting read from his Japanese naval escort on, you don't tend to think of Japan as an allied naval power in the Med in ww1? Anyway great painting as always.
    Best Iain

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  7. Well done! The figures look excellent!

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  8. Ken, these are just fantastic!! Highlanders are so hard to paint, but you've done these brilliantly - especially the tartan poking through the kilt covers of the moving figures. Especially great work on the Lewis gun (especially the caps), and well done on the link to the book - how can anyone resist a book with a title like "With a Highland Regiment in Mesopotamia"? Great work, Sir!

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  9. From the Glengarry caps to the kilts peeking out from aprons, this is a wonderful looking unit of Scots, Ken!

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