Friday, 24 February 2017

From KenR : 28mm WW1 Highlanders for Mesopotamia (45 points)


Another 2 smaller entries this week as I cleared a couple of mini projects off the paint table.


As soon as I found out in my research for WW1 in Mesopotamia that Highland Units had fought in the theatre, I was on the hunt for suitable figures which was when I came across Minifigs "Setting the East Ablaze" Range which had six suitable figures amongst the ones available, I ordered one of each as a test and was very impressed with the detail and animation of the models.


There were however no Command Figs and no Lewis gunners so I had to look around again for suitable figures which is when I located the Empress Miniatures Jazz Age Range, yes dated slightly after the WW1 period they would be destined for but not out of the range of possibilities, so I ordered a couple packs for a look see.

Empress Lewis Gun Team
Size comparison Minifigs left, Empress right.
Although the Minifigs are a bit more on the chunky side they are not a million miles away and I am happy enough to have them in the same unit, so here we have 9 x 25mm Foot figures for a cheeky 45 points.


I really love the character of these figures, the poses are great and the detail of the kilts peeping out from behind their khaki covers is just great. These will definitely be upgraded to a full 34 fig Battalion  (4 x 8 Fig Coys and 2 Command) in the near future.


I have painted the models up to represent the 2nd Battalion of The Black Watch (42nd Foot), they arrived in Mesopotamia just after the start of the Siege of Kut-al-Amarah having just left the Western Front, they march onto river Boats and within 3 weeks they were in action trying to break the seige, hastily thrown in to the fray they went from 950 to less than a 100 men in their first battle.

You just proved splendidly that kilts can be worn anywhere on the planet, on any war theater. Thanks for sharing your research on this part of the Great War. You already have all the required scenery to give them soon a baptism of fire. 45 points for your efforts. (Sylvain)  



19 comments:

  1. Very good! I like the fact they look suitably dusty and that you used such nice scenery to make the pictures!

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    1. Cheers Sander, always like to put a background on the photos

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  2. Nice work on the men who aren't afraid to wear skirts Ken :)

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    1. Cheers Tamsin, for me it depends how much I have had to drink ;-)

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  3. Great work on a cool period. Well done Ken.

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  4. Excellent work Ken. This project has been one of this year's highlights for me, I love these highlanders. I am very fond of the helmets, are they the "Wolsely" helmets that saw service in early (and off the beaten track) WW2?

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    1. Thanks Peter, I keep returning to my WW1 Mesopotamian Collection and have another couple of Battalions of Indian Infantry in the paint box along with some British and Turkish Cavalry.

      These are the Wolesley Helmets, a long time in service.

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    2. It's a classic helmet. I keep thinking of getting Perry with that helmet for East Africa 1940.

      Keep the Mesopotatmia stuff coming - it makes me hum the B52s.

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  5. Love these Ken. I've often looked at the Jazz Age range and managed to keep my resolve - you're not making it easy!

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    1. Thanks Curt, I was lucky the Jazz Age Range was around to fill the gaps in for me, I have also bought the Indian Mountain Gun from the range again for Mesopotamia lovely figures.

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  6. These look great Ken and some interesting history to go with.

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    1. Cheers Rod, there is a book "With a Highland Regiment in Mesopotamia" which you can find free on the Project Gutenberg site which covers the history of the unit.

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  7. Great figures and nice off the beaten track piece of history.
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks Iain it's a fascinating period, for me much more interesting than the Western Front

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  8. I quite like these fellows, Ken! That is some very fine brushwork you did on those sculpts too! I like those aprons with the peeking tartans too, very nice effect!

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  9. Thanks David, I agree they are fine sculpts.

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