Friday, 11 January 2019

From PaulSS: Hundred Years War French Infantry (120 points0


This week I have been continuing apace with the Hundred Years War project and another 24 foot have joined the French contingent. As previously all are from the Perry Miniatures range of plastics, mainly the Agincourt French Infantry 1415-29 set, but quite a few mash-ups using components from the English Army 1415-1429 set


The first unit to show is a group of six men at arms, I've tried to apply a bit of heraldry on these and some is done with standard brush work but other ones done using a technical pen, the first time I tried this out.


A second group of six men at arms completes the 'heavy' component, again mash-ups using components from both the French and English sets. 


Again I had some more attempts at heraldry and quite like what I did with Phillippe, Comte de Nevers, front and center with the cut off lance, although the fleur de lys could likely use another highlight.


The third unit completed over the weekend is a group of well-equipped infantry in the green livery of the Comte de Nevers as shown in the leaflet that comes in the Perry Miniatures box.


Many of these are mash-ups with bodies from the English set, typically the bodies in the French set have mail coifs while those in the English set have a cloth cowl. I think it gives a bit of variety into the mix. I've made some heavier armoured English long-bowmen that I hope to have done for next weeks update.


Now, having painted two units of men at arms, two units of sergeants and a unit of crossbowmen this represents a 24 point Lion Rampant warband so I have completed my first duel - Duel Rampant (SD5)


I'm quite pleased with that, but the force shall not stop there!

Here are a few close-ups of some of the figures, maybe a little out of focus.....



This is one of the infantry bodies off of the standard French frame, he is heavily armoured with at least partial plate so was re-purposed as a man at arms, the heraldry is for nobody in particular.


Another man at arms made entirely from components off of the French men at arms sprue. This was my first go at doing livery with a technical pen, certainly a lot easier than using a brush.


This man at arms is again from the French sprue, and is depicted in a long-sleeved half coat. The French men at arms sprue is a lot more 'dressed' than the English sprue.


The last man at arms here is Phillippe, Comte de Nevers I wanted to show my attempt at his heraldry, this was done using a brush, although a yellow technical pen would have been useful. It could probably use another highlight with the yellow.


Rear view of one of the sergeants with axes.


A very heavily armoured sergeant with axe.


The last man at arms is made using a body and head from the English sprue and arms from the French sprue. He has the cross of St. Denis field sign.

__________________________________________________________________

France? France? What no, this is Spain's week! Oh well, if we must.

That is a spectacular bit of kitbashing there, and a very good mash-up of the French and British sprues. I very much appreciate the work you've done on the men-at-arms, and they do stand out. While, as you know I am partial to the blue and white, I think the best is your first man at arms.

And now, Cardinal Fang will read out the Charges:
You are hereby charged that you did, on diverse dates, paint a total of twenty-four 28mm figures, for a total of one hundred, twenty points!
Now -- you will stay in the Comfy Chair until lunch time, with only a cup of coffee at eleven! 

38 comments:

  1. Lovely, lovely stuff Paul. High medieval liveries give me pause for thought, but I like what you've done here with the technical pen (do tell what type?). I'm with you on the swapping body parts, and hats (or helms) off to the Perry's for making box sets which allow such free range in swapping.

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    1. Thanks Peter, to do that red heraldry I used a 05 Micron: https://www.michaels.com/pigma-micron-05-fine-point-pen/10257732.html I wish I could have got a yellow or white....

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    2. Thanks I’ll check those out next time I’m at Michaels. I may also check what the Fines Arts faculty store has on campus. After the fact I remembered I’d used something like that to put Hull numbers on by WW2 destroyers.

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  2. Congradulations on Compleating you Duels Rampant Army! It looks outstanding!

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    1. Thank you Adam, more to come, English for Next week I think....

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  3. Really great work Paul! A fine army you have there.

    Christopher

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  4. Really great knights. You'll need a couple of English archers soon...

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    1. Thanks Noel, I already have quite a few English done: http://scrivsland.blogspot.com/2018/12/hundred-years-war-english-6.html
      Planning to add more next week.

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    2. Image of the English here: https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Ip8__-Zg_5Q/XAK3reIihKI/AAAAAAAAWu8/Z6VbeuluLkkViD72MU29IeLR8jj2QhbaACLcBGAs/s1600/DSCN8122.JPG

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  5. Really nice work on these French chaps,it's a lovely green and your conversions work a treat!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks Iain, the green is off a base-coat of Vallejo Reflective Green.

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  6. Wait, was I supposed to be painting Spanish this week, nobody told me ;)

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  7. Top drawer stuff, Paul. I like the heraldry for 'nobody in particular'. This is for the family that just elevated themselves from the ranks of royal pot-scubbers and saucy scullery maids. :)

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    1. Thanks Curt, I'm sure there were some gong-farmers in there too

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  8. Lovely, lovely work Paul - the component machups are very effective and the heraldry looks brilliant!

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  9. Remarkable work, really excellent. How did things go with the pen? Certainly looks great - I have wondered about trying that trick, but have chickened out, convinced the point of the pen would wreck the paint...

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    1. Thank you Greg. The pen allowed a light touch and was really easy to use on the painted surfaces, it may have helped that they were plastics.

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  10. Nice work all around, Paul! Congrats on "finishing " a force too. The heraldry turned out really well and I like how you varied the look with the other kits. A very impressive force!

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  11. Nicely done Paul! Some great eyecandy on display. It seems to be an interesting period I know much too little about.

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  12. Awesome! They look excellent. Cheers

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